Fuel sender units

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Fuel sender units

Postby ghostflyer » Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:59 pm

I have just seen a approval for the electronic sender unit for our fuel tanks . The company is CiES. At the moment I do not know who is marketing these . But these sender units will match up with a number of electronic gauges . So,we now have some choice if we need to replace the sender units . I had to replace my sender units a couple of years ago but they are not certified and they work “ok” .my old sender units literally rotted away . CiES approval no.[AML] SA 02511SE.
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Re: Fuel sender units

Postby pdb » Wed Dec 05, 2018 2:39 am

Pete Brown
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N4563C 1953 170B
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Re: Fuel sender units

Postby MoonlightVFR » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:25 pm

I am reading 870.00 plus labor.

Appears to still be a "float" activated unit. Is this slightly tetchy not High tetchy?

Maybe in certain usage situations.

$870.00 + would buy a lot of "cork" or metal floats.
gradyb, '54 B N2890C
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Re: Fuel sender units

Postby ghostflyer » Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:27 am

It wasn’t a cork issue ‘ [ I have plenty of corks as my wife drinks white wine ] it was the fingers or gears that corroded away. The new gauges had to be modified to work correctly.
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Re: Fuel sender units

Postby gahorn » Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:14 pm

I've rec'd three ph. calls on this thread already by new owners who were confused about the operations of C-170 fuel gauges (which, due to this thread, thought perhaps their overhead gauges might have electrical sending units.) I reassured them that all Cessna 170s which have not had their fuel quantity systems modified have purely MECHANICAL floats which act DIRECTLY upon the meters in the overhead/wing-root via a geared-magnet. NO ELECTRICAL source is required. They work even with the Master Switch Off.

The most common problem with original gauges is …. Age. The original varnished, cork floats deteriorate and fail to float.
The next most common complaint is leaking gauge/meter gaskets and faded faces.

The best FIX in my opinion is to order new Rochester Nitrile rubber floats from suppliers like Aircraft Spruce and completely replace the old cork floats. (Rochester was the OEM for these gauges.) The cost is NOT $870 plus labor. It's $3.35 plus shipping. https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/ ... -03395.php

An entirely new replacement gauge is also available although it will require "fitment". (You will have to bend and perhaps cut the operating wire-arm to match that from your removed gauge so the operating length is the same.) It costs $105. https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/ ... _gauge.php

Gaskets and other associated parts are also available from Spruce. 877-477-7823 They are one of our frequent convention supporters, as is Univair who also supports these gauges.

The units mentioned by ghostflyer fit many modified and OEM ELECTRICALLY-OPERATED systems such as found in C-172, 175, 180/182, etc. aircraft.
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Re: Fuel sender units

Postby ghostflyer » Sat Dec 08, 2018 4:23 am

The fuel sender units by CiES do have approval to be fitted to 170 aircraft . You have also the cost of the gauges also. So around a total cost of $1400 you can have a new system . How accurate in flight ??? To me it’s a alternate solution . Legally.
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Re: Fuel sender units

Postby gahorn » Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:10 pm

On additional note... I hope everyone's flight instructors taught them to disregard fuel gauges except as entertainment and a possible comparison during pre-flight activities. The BEST method is to determine how much fuel is in the tanks during preflight...then start the clock on takeoff, and keep track of fuel burns. While gauges and fuel-flow gizmos are nice... and while the most modern ones can be addicting... they should never be completely trusted.

Also, remember that the FAA's guide-rule on the calibration of fuel gauges is that they must read EMPTY when the tanks are EMPTY. If your gauges read empty ....as long as they don't read something other than empty when the tanks are dry.... they are still legal. 8O

I use a clear tube type of fuel dipstick made for 19 gal 172 tanks by cutting off that portion below the zero-mark and find it exceptionally accurate on 170A and B models.
'53 B-model N146YS SN:25713
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